teaching with passion - 4myschoolsHow dreary is it when you are listening to a presenter who is drowning on with little enthusiasm for what they are talking about? In all walks of life one still experiences these disastrous events – I certainly find it difficult to remain engaged even when the subject is captivating if the presenter has no enthusiasm.

If the person in front of you is sucking the energy out of a subject what would you do? Would you put up with this style of teaching in a business or a school?
The implications are far worse in a school than a business. In a business the audience has greater choice, they can walk out, speak out and or slate the presenter in the feedback form, swap the presenter, repeat the event until it works.

None of these options are available to school children subjected to poor teaching, what can they do?

Let us be honest there are no options for most children they have to simply sit through the lesson and watch the clock – at the end of the term their report simply hides the fact that a poor teacher has just wasted a term of the children’s’ education.

Sadly if that teacher continues as they are the “education” of the next batch of kids suffers the same.

Often teachers that fall into the trap of low energy teaching incite children to behave poorly and a negative circle is instigated from which there are only losers.

So what about teaching with passion?

Giving any presentation, talking about any subject, telling a story, a joke or reading a book aloud all require energy and passion. Clearly there is a balance to be struck but rather too much energy than too little.

In business presenting a proposition requires the message to be covered clearly and in an engaging manner within the first few minutes (even seconds) of a presentation, this is critical.
Likewise in a classroom where the teacher details the objectives what will be covered why and how, all with energy. Without the passion ones audience quickly switches off and monotony sets in from which it is difficult to recover, especially when children begin to distract each other.

Teaching children the necessity to show their passion for a subject whatever it might be is critical and is a fundamental aspect of their education. Teachers that are able to encourage their students to show their passion for a subject win hands down and pass on a massive advantage to their pupils regardless of the subject – simply having passion and energy for a subject or interest is infectious and no child should leave school without having experienced the joy of real passion for a subject, topic, hobby or sport.

As a supply teacher one is instantly at a disadvantage as the children don’t know you but do know you can go one of two ways “engaging or not”.

So the choice for all supply teachers and permanent teachers is clear are you going to create energy and passion around the subjects you are teaching or are you not? Those that do, succeed along with the pupils they teach.